Best USB Mic for Recording Singing, Music, and Podcasts


Best-USB-Mic-for-singing-featured-Image

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In the past, USB microphones were only used for Streaming, Podcasting, and Video Conferencing. But in many new mics, the quality has improved, and their use can be extended to recording singing, vocals, and music.

This buyer’s guide is designed to help you choose the best USB mic for singing, the spoken word, and instrument recording. But I’ve also included the microphone’s appearance as a key factor because the mic will be seen by viewers on your preferred content channel. That’s why I didn’t include Samson Q2U, even though it’s a terrific USB performer, has USB and XLR outputs, and is available at a low entry-level price.

Any of these mics would be an excellent choice whether you’re buying for yourself or looking for a gift for someone else. For each, I’ve included the best deals I can find on Amazon. If you use them, thank you very much since you’re helping to support this site.

In a hurry? Here are our Top 3 USB choices

Best All-Rounder
Samson Technologies Samson G-Track Pro Professional USB Condenser...
Best for Vocal
Audio-Technica AT2020USB+ Cardioid Condenser USB Microphone, With Built-In...
Best Value
FIFINE USB Podcast Microphone for Recording Streaming, Condenser Computer...
Samson Technologies Samson G-Track Pro Professional USB Condenser...
Audio-Technica AT2020USB+ Cardioid Condenser USB Microphone, With Built-In...
FIFINE USB Podcast Microphone for Recording Streaming, Condenser Computer...
Type
Condenser
Condenser
Condenser
Polar pattern
Cardioid/Omni/Bi-directional
Cardioid
Cardioid
Frequency response
50Hz-20kHz
20Hz-20kHz
40Hz-20kHz
Audio resolution
96kHz/24bit
48kHz/16bit
48kHz/16bit
Recommended use
Vocal/Instrument/Speech
Vocal/Instrument/Speech
Vocal/Instrument/Speech
Price
$128.00
$130.00
$50.99
-
Best All-Rounder
Samson Technologies Samson G-Track Pro Professional USB Condenser...
Samson Technologies Samson G-Track Pro Professional USB Condenser...
Type
Condenser
Polar pattern
Cardioid/Omni/Bi-directional
Frequency response
50Hz-20kHz
Audio resolution
96kHz/24bit
Recommended use
Vocal/Instrument/Speech
Price
$128.00
Best for Vocal
Audio-Technica AT2020USB+ Cardioid Condenser USB Microphone, With Built-In...
Audio-Technica AT2020USB+ Cardioid Condenser USB Microphone, With Built-In...
Type
Condenser
Polar pattern
Cardioid
Frequency response
20Hz-20kHz
Audio resolution
48kHz/16bit
Recommended use
Vocal/Instrument/Speech
Price
$130.00
-
Best Value
FIFINE USB Podcast Microphone for Recording Streaming, Condenser Computer...
FIFINE USB Podcast Microphone for Recording Streaming, Condenser Computer...
Type
Condenser
Polar pattern
Cardioid
Frequency response
40Hz-20kHz
Audio resolution
48kHz/16bit
Recommended use
Vocal/Instrument/Speech
Price
$50.99

Last update on 2021-12-06 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

5 Best USB Mics for Singing, Music, and Content Creation

Samson G-Track Pro

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The G-Track Pro provides great quality for singers/songwriters/musicians on a budget. So, if you’re a music creator who also wants to do podcasters and video content this is a mic to consider. But if you are only a podcaster, gamer, or streamer, then you might want to choose one of the other mics here. Here’s why. Vocals, acoustic and electric guitar all sound great and reasonably natural, with a little boost in the high end for clarity. However, that slight lift in the treble frequencies may detract on the spoken voice, especially if your voice is prone to sibilance. Personally, I like recordings with a brighter tone, and if it’s a bit of a problem I can always adjust the EQ.

This mic has a full-size 6.3mm jacket socket so you can plug in an instrument to the built-in high-resolution interface. So, you get a great mic with instrument connectivity for about the price you would pay for a good audio interface alone. The Samson G-Track Pro combines great build, sound quality, and versatility with affordability. For comparison, it’s about the same as a Blue Yeti.

The mic body and stand are all metal and heavy, so the mic will stay put. But if you’re going to be serious about any kind of recording, get a proper stand and get the mic off your desk.

If you haven’t already realized, I really like this mic. It’s rugged, sounds great, offers versatility, it’s attractive, and the price is affordable.

The G-Track Pro is an all-around good-sounding microphone that’s also very versatile for spoken word, vocals, and music. As you’d expect, you get zero-latency headphone monitoring, pretty good preamps, the ability to record at a sampling rate of up to 96kHz, and a bit depth of 24-bits.

A quick warning if you don’t have a lot of experience of recording with quality microphones. The G-Track Pro is a condenser mic, so it is very sensitive. It can pick up background noise if you turn up the gain and have the mic too far away. This is not a failing of the mic, condenser mics are designed to be sensitive and record detail. On the other hand, dynamic mics, like the Shure MV7, will reject background room noise but you will need to get closer and have them almost in your face.

If I had to criticize this mic, it would be that because it does not have a standard mic stand mounting point, so you will need the G-Track boom adapter or official shock mount. Plus, in most cases, I don’t see the need for bi-directional and Omni polar patterns. Most creators will use the cardioid pattern, so Samson could have gotten rid of the extra mic capsule to produce a superb microphone for an even better price. I may have been too critical of this mic because I do think this mic delivers more than its price tag would suggest.

Specs and Features:

  • Rugged build quality with all metal construction.
  • Mic cartridge type: Condenser.
  • Polar pattern: Cardioid / Omnidirectional / bi-directional.
  • Frequency response of 50Hz-20kHz.
  • Max audio resolution: 96kHz sample rate /24bit bit depth.
  • Connections: USB-B, 3.5mm headphone, 6.3mm instrument jack.
  • LED mute & peaking indicator.
  • Built-in headphone output for zero latency monitoring.
  • Controls for mic gain, headphone volume, mic muting, polar pattern selection, mono/2-track selection.
  • Includes desktop stand and mic stand adapter.

Included in the box:

  • 1x G-Track Pro microphone
  • 1x Desktop stand
  • 1x USB-B to USB-A cable
  • 1x Owner’s manual
Samson Technologies Samson G-Track Pro Professional USB Condenser...
  • All-in-one: Professional USB microphone with audio interface. Record your voice and instrument at...
  • The right mic: Ideal for streaming, gaming, podcasting, and recording music
  • At your fingers: Front panel mixer with microphone level, instrument level and headphone volume...
  • Built for the studio: Dual 1" (25 millimeter) condenser capsules with three selectable pick up...

Last update on 2021-12-06 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Audio Technica AT2020 USB+

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Like the Samson G-Track Pro, this mic would be great for singers and musicians. However, don’t let that put you off if you want to record the spoken word unless you’re streaming in a room with a lot of background noise.

It’s an all-metal design and the weight gives it a nice pro feel in the hand. I’m not as keen on the thumbwheel dials on the front for headphone volume and monitor mix since you can’t visually tell what level is set and thumbwheels seem a bit 20th century (although you might like the retro look). I would prefer twist knobs and a pointer mark and a scale on the mic body.

The mic sounds pretty good, with a full frequency response. Consequently, vocals, speech, acoustic and electric instruments sounded good. However, the cardioid polar pattern isn’t super-tight, that coupled with it being a sensitive condenser mic, folks like gamers may find it’s a bit lively when it comes to background noise like keyboards. But for vocals and music, some room ambiance can work to your advantage.

Unfortunately, there’s no gain control on the mic body, so you’ll have to control the gain on your computer. The maximum bit depth and sample rate are also a little disappointing, although the mic sounds good. More recent USB mics can offer 24bit bit depths and 96kHz sampling rates, but perhaps Audio Technica’s thinking is, “don’t try fix something that doesn’t need fixing”.  

Specs and Features:

  • All metal construction with a nice weight.
  • Mic cartridge type: Condenser.
  • Polar pattern: Cardioid.
  • Frequency response of 20Hz-20kHz.
  • Max audio resolution: 48kHz sample rate /16bit bit depth.
  • Connections: USB-B, 3.5mm headphone.
  • LED power indicator behind grill.
  • Built-in headphone output for zero latency monitoring.
  • Controls for headphone volume and headphone monitor mix between mic and computer audio.

Included in the box:

  • 1x AT2020 USB+ microphone.
  • 1x USB-B to USB-A cable.
  • 1x 5/8-27 to 3/8 inch mic stand adapter.
  • 1x Desktop tripod stand.
  • 1x Padded microphone carrying case.
  • 1x User’s manual.
Audio-Technica AT2020USB+ Cardioid Condenser USB Microphone, With Built-In...
  • Condenser microphone with USB output for digital recording
  • High quality A/D converter with 16 bit, 44.1/48 kilohertz sampling rate for superb audio
  • Headphone jack with volume control allows you to monitor the microphone signal with no delay
  • Mix control allows you to blend your microphone signal and prerecorded audio

Last update on 2021-12-06 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Shure MV7 USB Microphone

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The heritage of this USB mic is obviously, it’s clearly modeled on the legendary Shure SM7b dynamic microphone that is loved in recording studios, broadcasters, and YouTubers for its warmth of tone.

Although the MV7 sounds good, it is not an SM7b that has had a USB output added. But that’s not surprising considering it’s a third to half the price of an SM7b plus preamp and audio interface. Non-the-less, the MV7 has an agreeable warmth of tone and a quality that can be adjusted in the free ShurePlus Motiv software (for desktop and iOS). You can have the sound flat or add a high pass filter, and presence boost filters, plus a limiter and compressor.

One of the stand-out features of the MV7 is its dual outputs. On the base of the mic, you’ll find both XLR and micro-USB sockets. But you don’t just have the choice of one or the other, you can use both outputs simultaneously.

You can send the unaltered audio from the dynamic capsule to an audio interface or digital recorder by using the XLR out or letting the MV7’s internal digital signal processor send the digital audio to your computer via USB.

The dual output is a kind of futureproofing. If later, you decide to move to an audio interface recording system or need to plug it into a sound mixing desk you can carry on using your Shure MV7 microphone.

To get the best from this mic I’d recommend getting close. However, the foam windjammer that ships with the MV7 could do with an upgrade. Use the much better foam windjammer from an SM7b or get a Stedman Proscreen Pop FilterOpens in a new tab. available on Amazon. The Stedman isn’t cheap, but it works very well.

Specs and Features:

  • Rugged build quality with all metal construction.
  • Mic cartridge type: Dynamic.
  • Polar pattern: Cardioid.
  • Frequency response of 50Hz-16kHz.
  • Max audio resolution: 48kHz sample rate /24bit bit depth.
  • Connections: micro-USB, XLR, 3.5mm headphone.
  • Hybrid dual XLR/micro-USB outputs.
  • Built-in headphone output for zero latency monitoring while recording.
  • Touch button controls for gain, monitoring volume, headphone mix, and mic muting.
  • Includes adjustable yoke for easy positioning and mounting on standard 5/8″-27 threaded stands or booms.
  • Customizable Sound Signature using ShurePlus MOTIV app.

Included in the box:

  • 1x Shure MOTIV MV7 microphone.
  • 1x 10 ft (3m) USB-A cable.
  • 1x 10 ft (3m) USB-C cable.
Shure MV7 USB Podcast Microphone for Podcasting, Recording, Live Streaming...
  • USB OR XLR CONNECTIONS: Dual USB;XLR output allows digital or analog recording
  • CLOSE MIC APPLICATIONS: Great for podcasting, recording, live streaming, and more
  • INTUITIVE TOUCH PANEL CONTROLS: Intuitive touch panel for control over gain, monitoring volume,...
  • BUILT-IN HEADPHONE OUTPUT: The Built-in headphone output allows for direct headphone monitoring...

Last update on 2021-12-06 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Blue Yeti X USB Microphone

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Let me say that the Blue Yeti X is a welcome upgrade to the classic Yeti, but I’d only buy this if you’re just getting into home music recording, or you need to match what other folks are using it. If you are a gamer, podcaster, or streamer the Yeti X does give a warmer voice tone compared to the classic Yeti but realistically you will only need the cardioid mode. Unless you really need the other polar patterns either get a cheaper cardioid mic that sounds the same or spend the same amount of money on a better microphone that only offers a cardioid polar pattern. It’s don’t think the Yeti X isn’t up to the job, it’s really nice, but I reckon you can make your cash go a little further if you’re just recording speech.

Other than music creators there’s one other type of creator who might benefit from getting the Yeti X, and that’s anyone creating immersive ASMR recordings. You can easily create an immersive stereo image by switching to the stereo mode.

For most folks, I’m only recommending this mic for making music. For singing the Yeti is fine, but an acoustic guitar, or small group, sounds good when using the stereo pattern. There’s also no effort needed in creating the stereo image, you don’t need a pair of matched mics or an audio interface. Just turn the pattern dial to stereo and you’re done. An electric guitar sounds a little too full at the bass end, but you may like that. If not, you could process that out.

I like the 11-segment LED meter around the front control button. You can check your level and get a visual warning if you’re clipping.

Another good feature is the Logitech G-Hub software where you can control most things on the mic. If you’re on Windows, you can access the Blue VO!CE effects and get free real-time processing. You can make Yeti X sound the way you want using presets or create your own unique sound.

The desktop stand comes pre-installed but can be removed and the mic mounted on a boom arm or mic stand with a standard 5/8-27 screw thread.

Specs and Features:

  • Sturdy all metal construction.
  • Mic cartridge type: 4 Condenser elements.
  • Polar pattern: Cardioid, Omnidirectional, Bi-directional, & Stereo.
  • Frequency response of 20Hz-20kHz.
  • Max audio resolution: 48kHz sample rate /24 bit bit depth.
  • Connections: micro USB, 3.5mm headphone.
  • 11-segment LED meter.
  • Built-in headphone output for zero latency monitoring.
  • Control button on front for gain, headphone volume, headphone monitor mix, mute, etc.
  • Control button on rear to toggle through polar patterns.

Included in the box:

  • 1x Blue Yeti X USB microphone with installed desktop stand.
  • 1x micro-USB-B to USB-A cable.
  • 1x User quick start guide.
Blue Yeti X USB Microphone for PC & Mac, Gaming, Podcast, Streaming and...
  • Four-Capsule Array – Capture legendary Blue broadcast sound with greater focus and clarity than...
  • High-Res LED Metering – Visualize your voice level at a glance and adjust up or down for powerful,...
  • Multi-Function Smart Knob – Fine-tune your on-stream sound with easy-access controls for mic gain,...
  • Blue VO!CE Software: Craft the perfect broadcast vocal sound and entertain your audience with...

Last update on 2021-12-06 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Fifine K678 USB Microphone

Opens in a new tab.

Just like the look of the Shure MV7 is obviously modeled on the SM7b, the Fifine K678 seems to have adopted the little brother look to the Blue Yeti.

The similarity in shape and most of the features and specifications seem very like the Yeti, but in a slightly smaller package. I like the more diminutive size of the Fifine, but, like the Yeti, I would mount it on a mic stand instead of using the supplied desktop stand. I’d also recommend getting a pop filter for this mic, especially if you get close in.

Like the Blue Yeti, the bottom of the Fifine K678 USB mic has a 3.5mm headphone socket so you can monitor the audio, and a mini-USB socket to connect the mic to a computer. Between the sockets, there’s a threaded mounting hole to take the adapter to mount the mic on a standard boom or scissor arm.

The microphone has controls for mic gain, headphone volume, and mute. There’s also an indicator LED to show that the mic is powered/muted.

The audio resolution maxes out at 16-bit/48kHz and the frequency response is 40Hz–20kHz. In tests, the Fifine sounds similar to the Blue Yeti, but because it only has a single polar pattern it’s cheaper.  

Specs and Features:

  • Rugged build quality with all metal construction.
  • Mic cartridge type: Condenser.
  • Polar pattern: Cardioid.
  • Frequency response of 40Hz-20kHz.
  • Max audio resolution: 48kHz sample rate /16bit bit depth.
  • Connections: mini-USB and 3.5mm headphone.
  • Built-in headphone output for zero latency monitoring while recording.
  • Controls for gain, headphone volume, and mic muting.
  • Includes desktop stand and 5/8″ male to 3/8″ female adapter for mounting on to a boom or scissor arm.

Included in the box:

  • 1x Fifine K678 USB microphone.
  • 1x metal desktop stand.
  • 1x 6.5ft USB cable.
  • 1x 5/8-inch male to 3/8-inch female mic thread screw adapter.
  • 1x user manual.
Sale
FIFINE USB Podcast Microphone for Recording Streaming, Condenser Computer...
  • 【Streamlined Setup】USB output enables direct integration with a desktop or laptop...
  • 【Excellent Sound Quality】Stereo microphone deliver crystal clear, well-balanced reproduction...
  • 【Easy-to-use Controls】The desk microphone's 3.5mm stereo headphone output features a volume...
  • 【Decent Material for Durability】Integrated desktop stand made by die-cast zinc construction for...

Last update on 2021-12-06 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Best USB Mic Summary

Samson G-Track ProBest All-Rounder. This mic does it all and it does it well at an affordable price. It’s specifically for singer/musicians but is also good for spoken word recordings or streams. It has a full-size 1/4-inch instrument jack socket, so you can record high-resolution vocals and guitar either mixed or on separate tracks.

Audio Technica AT2020 USB+Best for Vocals. Sounds good with a full natural sound whether you’re singing or speaking, but because it’s a sensitive condenser mic, it may pick up background keyboard clicks if you’re a gamer. The AT202 USB+ looks like a pro mic, although it lacks the attractive looks of some others. At a similar price to a Blue Yeti but arguably sounds a bit better.

Shure MV7 USBBest Quality & Future Proof. Dynamic mic with XLR and USB outputs. Looks and sounds great. Excellent choice if you want a quality mic you can use for USB solo streaming with the option to upgrade to a studio with XLR studio audio interface or mixer. 24bit/48kHz audio resolution.

Blue Yeti XBest Music Starter. The Blue Yeti updated. Good for someone getting into music creation. The Blue software allows lots of customization of the mic’s tone, plus high-resolution 24-bit/48kHz audio.

Fifine K678Best Value. Condenser mic for those who want the sound, look, and features of a Blue Yeti but only need the cardioid mode and at a lower price. 16-bit/48kHz audio resolution.

USB Microphone Cable Tip

One thing I would point out is that all the USB mics I have used never have long enough USB cables. I always try to get the mic as far away from noise sources as possible, things like computer fans, keyboards, etc. I record in a voice booth, so I got a long USB extension cable and passed it through a hole in the booth wall, then sealed the hole around the cable with rubber grommets.


Top Tips and Tricks for Better Sound from a USB Microphone

  1. If you are recording a single sound source, like your voice or an instrument, use a cardioid mic or the cardioid mode on a multi polar pattern mic like a Blue Yeti.
  2. If your microphone comes with a table-top stand, don’t use it. Instead, put your microphone on a proper mic stand, either a scissor arm, boom arm, or simple vertical mic stand. This will help to mechanically isolate the microphone from sounds transmitted through the table or desk. That is bumps, touching the desk, or tapping on a keyboard.
  3. Use a good quality wind screen or pop filter to avoid picking up plosives. The circular mesh filters are much better than most foam pop filters because of the way they diffuse or divert the energy in the air away from the mic element. Even so, some foam pop filters can be good and help make the microphone sound warmer and better, so using a mesh a foam pop filter together will often give the best results.
  4. Place your microphone close to your sound source, whether that is your mouth, your instrument, or amp speaker. By close I mean 6-10 inches (15-25cm). Doing so will avoid picking up the room sound and other noises like computer fans.
  5. Choose a microphone suited to what you are recording. Condenser mics tend to be very sensitive and are good at picking up the detail in sound. So, they are great for clarity and picking up the high end of the frequency range in vocals. Being more sensitive they will also pick up more of the sound in the room. Dynamic mics are good at recording loud sounds, they often have a warm tone, and their sensitively often drops off quickly with distance from the mic. Because the difference in the mic element of the two types of mic, dynamics tend to be able to take more physical abuse than condenser mics.
  6. Point the correct part of microphone toward the sound source. Microphones can either be top address or side address. You speak into the end or top of a top address mic, typically a dynamic mic like the Shure MV7. You speak into the side, usually the logo side, of a side address mic, typically a condenser mic. If you do not address the mic correctly you or the instruments will sound quiet and terrible.
  7. If you are in a room with stuff that produce sound, like computer fans, keyboards, other people, etc., make sure they are 180° behind the microphone. This is the dead area of the cardioid polar pattern of the microphone, where the pick-up of is minimized (although not eliminated).
  8. Cut down on room echo, more correctly room reverberation. This will make the room sound less lively in the recording. Use sound absorbing material, such as acoustic tiles and panels, or include plenty of furnishings and stuff in the room, to avoid an empty-room sound.

USB Microphone FAQ

Which is better for vocals, a condenser or dynamic mic?

Personal taste, your voice, and the application will determine which type of microphone is best for recording vocals. But condenser mics are more sensitive and offer more clarity. Dynamic mics can add warmth to a voice, are better at coping with higher intensity sound, and can be beneficial if sibilance is a problem.

At what distance can I reliably record with a USB mic to an iPhone with lightning port?

Apple says that for optimal performance the Apple Lightning cable can extend up to 2 meters (6.5 feet). Therefore, Apple only recommends and sells Lightning cables up to 2m long. Third parties may sell longer cables but they may not always work.

Do USB mics need sound card?

An additional sound card is not required with a USB microphone since the microphone’s internal digital signal processor is a sound card. This is used to create the digital signal required by your computer. On many USB mics, this internal soundcard can also be used to monitor the audio.

How do I connect a USB microphone to my laptop?

Connect one end of a USB cable to the microphone, then plug the other end into a USB port on the computer. On a laptop, the USB ports are on the sides or the rear. Desktop computers can also have ports on the front. Recent USB mics use USB-C cables, while older models often use micro-USB to USB-A cables.

Can a USB mic work on an audio interface?

USB mics cannot connect to an audio interface or sound mixer via USB cable, since they only accept XLR, ¼-inch TRS jack, and MIDI inputs. But some USB mics have a headphone output for monitoring. Use a cable with 3.5mm and 6.35mm jacks to connect from the headphone socket to the audio interface.

How do I record with a USB mic?

Plug the USB mic’s cable into a USB port on your PC and Windows will report it is setting up your PnP audio device. You do not need to install any drivers. When you open your DAW the USB mic will be in the list of available audio input sources. Select the USB mic and you can start recording.

What is a good free recording software?

The two best free recording apps are Garageband and Audacity. Garageband runs on macOS, iPadOS, and iOS. Audacity is available for Windows, macOS, and Linux. Both apps can be used to record and edit multitrack music projects, podcasts, and video soundtracks.

How do I connect a USB mic to my iPhone or iPad?

To connect a USB mic to an iPhone first plug the mic’s USB-A plug into an Apple Lightning to USB 3 Camera Adapter and then plug the adapter’s lightning plug into the iOS device. If the iPhone says the mic requires too much power, plug a power adapter into the lightning socket on the camera adapter.

Here are some of my favorite content creation tools

Thank you for taking the time to read this article. Hopefully, you found it helpful in creating your own content for your social media and YouTube channels. I have listed some of the gear I use as a YouTuber and online course creator and hope you’ll also find it useful. I have recommended this equipment to my readers and my own family and friends.

Camera: You can use your smartphone when starting out, but I’d recommend getting a Mirrorless Camera. I use both the Canon EOS ROpens in a new tab. and EOS R6Opens in a new tab.. Both can shoot Full HD or 4K, and the Eye AutoFocus will keep you sharply in focus even if you move around. If your budget is smaller, I would recommend the Canon M50 MkIIOpens in a new tab..

Video microphone: Arguably, sound quality is more important than video quality, that’s why I use a Deity V-MiOpens in a new tab.c D3 Opens in a new tab.Pro super-cardioid shotgun microphone on my mirrorless cameras. It automatically powers on when I turn on my camera and powers down when I switch off the camera. But I also like the versatility of the mic. It automatically senses what device it is connected to ensuring it works with SLRs, camcorders, smartphones, Handy recorders, laptops, and bodypack transmitters.

Video Lighting: Although daylight is my favorite lighting, I use LED lighting for all the videos I shoot indoors because good lighting can make a tremendous difference to the visual appeal of a video. For video calls on Zoom or Teams, I use the Lume Cube Broadcast Lighting KitOpens in a new tab.. For YouTube videos and creating video tutorials for online courses, I love the Lume Cube 18″ Cordless Ring Light Kit. Both these lights are excellent, and I wouldn’t hesitate in recommending them.

Teleprompter software: I use the iCue teleprompterOpens in a new tab. app on my iPad when using it with a traditional beam-splitter teleprompter and control it remotely with the iCue RemoteOpens in a new tab. app on my iPhone. On my PC I use Teleprompter ProOpens in a new tab. from the Microsoft Store.

Teleprompter hardware: Teleprompters help you present to the camera without needing to learn your script. When I need more screen space and the durability of an all-metal build, I like the Glide Gear TMP100Opens in a new tab. beam-splitter teleprompter. It works with my mirrorless cameras and uses an iPad or tablet to run the teleprompter software.

Source: 1Opens in a new tab.

Tosh Lubek runs an audio and video production business in the UK and has been using the Canon EOS R since it was released in the Autumn of 2018 and the Canon EOS R6 in 2020. He has used both cameras to shoot TV commercials broadcast on Sky TV, promotional business videos, videos of events and functions, and YouTube creator content. He has also won several international awards for his advertising and promotional work. You can meet him by visiting his “video booth” at HashTag Business Events across the country.

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