6 Best Blue Yeti Pop Filters: Affordable and Effective


6-best-blue-yeti-pop-filters

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Are you looking for the best Blue Yeti pop filter? Great! This article will guide you in buying the one piece of audio gear, relative to price, which will produce the biggest improvement in the sound quality of your spoken word or vocal recordings.

Although I own professional microphones for my audio and video business, I also bought a Blue Yeti as a USB microphone. Having used it, I can answer the frequently asked question, “do I need a pop filter for a Blue Yeti”. In most cases, yes you do, especially if you’re inexperienced.  

These filters eliminate pops and blasts caused by plosives. I explain more in an article about what causes a microphone to pop.

This is an independent guide to the best pop filters for Blue Yeti microphones. My reviews are based on my personal audio recording knowledge drawn from 40 years of working in professional broadcast and production studios. I have NOT received any sponsorship payment or free products that might influence my views.

I tested six popular Blue Yeti pop filters and judged them on how effective they were at preventing pops, whether they obscure your view when reading a script, and how they look on camera.

I’ll explain how I tested these filters and provide full details on each one. But first, here are the 6 Best Blue Yeti Pop Filters, plus a brief overview.

The best pop filter for Blue Yeti microphones: 6 best choices

Mudder Blue Yeti Foam Cover Windscreen: Pop Reduction Rating: 4.0/10

The Blue Yeti Foam Cover is a budget foam windscreen. This high-density foam filter slips snuggly onto the Blue Yeti’s grille and stays in place, even when inverted. It’s suitable for all the Yeti’s polar patterns, looks good on video, has a small form factor, and looks familiar to viewers. An average performer in stopping pops.

Moukey Metal Mesh and Fabric Windscreen Filter: Pop Reduction Rating: 5.6/10

Budget pop filter. Three-layer metal mesh and foam pop filter that clamps on the side of the Yeti so the mic-to-pop filter distance cannot be adjusted. Works OK if you are not too close to the microphone. Suitable for a cardioid polar pattern. Looks good on video.

Sunmns Furry Windscreen: Pop Reduction Rating: 9.4/10

Budget furry windscreen. Artificial fur fabric windscreen that fits over the mic’s grille and is held in place by an elasticated rim. Effectively a dead cat type filter. Suitable for all the Yeti’s polar patterns. Looks OK on video, small form factor, good anti-pop performer.

Aokeo microphone fabric mesh pop filter: Pop Reduction Rating: 9.8/10

Budget mesh studio pop filter. Circular double-layer fabric mesh pop filter on a gooseneck mount that attaches to the microphone desktop or boom arm stand. The distance between the pop filter and the mic grille can be adjusted. Suitable for a cardioid polar pattern. Looks OK video, larger form factor, great anti-pop performer.

Aokeo metal mesh pop filter: Pop Reduction Rating: 9.4/10

Budget mesh pop filter. Curved rectangular metal mesh on a gooseneck mount that attaches to the microphone desktop or boom arm stand. The distance between the pop filter and the mic grille can be adjusted. Suitable for a cardioid polar pattern.

Gator Frameworks metal screen pop filter: Pop Reduction Rating: 9.9/10

Mid-price studio mesh pop filter. Circular metal screen pop filter on a gooseneck mount that attaches to the microphone desktop or boom arm stand. The distance between the pop filter and the mic grille can be adjusted. Suitable for a cardioid polar pattern.

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Read on for more details about these pop filters. I explain how I tested them, you can listen to sound clips recorded with each filter, see my results league table, and read my review of each pop filter. In addition, I’ve recorded a video to find which of these is the Best Pop Filter for the Blue Yeti.

How I tested these Blue Yeti pop filters  

I tested the pop filters by recording in my voice booth with a Blue Yeti Blackout microphone. The mic was mounted on s Blue Microphones Radius III shock mount that was on an InnoGear large microphone boom arm. I positioned myself 6-inches from the microphone, and where possible I placed the pop filter 4 inches in front of the microphone. I recorded 3 takes with each pop filter/windscreen into Adobe Audition on my PC. As a reference, I also made a Control recording without any filter or windscreen. Later I also made a recording with me 10 inches from the microphone.

I judged each filter on a few factors, although the first one of how good it is at preventing pops, must be the overriding one.

  1. Pop prevention.
  2. Ease of installation.
  3. View obstruction.
  4. On-camera appearance.

Pop filter test recordings

Here are the recordings, along with an image of the set-up in the voice booth.

Blue Yeti Control Recording No Pop Filter

Test recording: Control with no pop filter or windscreen

Mudder Blue Yeti Foam Cover Windscreen

Test recording: Mudder Foam Windscreen on Blue Yeti

Moukey Pop Filter

Test recording: Moukey Pop Filter on Blue Yeti

Sunmns Furry Windscreen

Test recording: Sunmns Furry Windscreen on Blue Yeti

Aokeo Fabric Mesh Pop Filter

Test recording: Aokeo Fabric Mesh Pop Filter on Blue Yeti

Aokeo Metal Mesh Pop Filter

Test recording: Aokeo Metal Mesh Pop Filter on Blue Yeti

Gator Frameworks Metal Screen Pop Filter

Test recording: Gator Frameworks Metal Screen Pop Filter on Blue Yeti

Pop Filter Test Results, Ratings, & Summary

The following table has the results of the test. If you just want to know how well each pop filter did in my test recordings in reducing pops, look at the Pop Reduction Rating column. The figure is out of a maximum possible of 10. The pop reduction rating is based on the average number of pops across three test recordings with each pop filter. The higher the number the better. So a score of 10.0 would mean 100% of potential pops were prevented, and 0 would mean no potential pops were prevented.

The Total Rating in the table is more subjective. To the Pop Reduction Rating, I added my view of how easy it was to install the pop filter, to what degree the filter blocked the view of a script, and whether the filter looks distracting in a video recording.

As I said, the Total rating is subjective and you may disagree, however, the Pop Reduction Rating is based on my test recordings.

Pop FilterPop Reduction RatingEase of InstallationScript ViewabilityAppearanceTotal Rating
Mudder Foam Cover4.03437.0
Moukey Pop Filter5.62426.8
Sunmns Furry Windscreen9.43328.7
Aokeo Metal Mesh9.33318.2
Aokeo Fabric Mesh9.83217.9
Gator Frameworks9.93329.0
Pop filter test results table

Results summary

If you want the best Blue Yeti pop filter, in terms of its ability to eliminate pops, look at the Pop Prevention column in the table above. The rating is out of 10 and based on the average number of pops from three recordings with each pop filter or windscreen and compared to the control recording when no pop filter or windscreen was used.  

My Total rating of these pop filters considers how easy I found the filters to install, how well I could see a script placed beside the microphone, and my opinion of how the filter looked on video. Obviously, this last factor is irrelevant if you are recording a voiceover or podcast where you are not seen. Also, you may disagree with my opinion on how attractive the filters look.

Best performer

The Aokeo fabric mesh and Gator Frameworks metal screen pop filters were almost equal in terms of preventing pops, with the Gator Frameworks filter slightly ahead. What also made the Gator Frameworks better for me was that it was easier to work with and looked slightly better on video.

The diameter of the Gator Frameworks pop filter was less than the Aokeo fabric filter, and I could see my script through the metal screen of the Gator Frameworks filter but not through the dual fabric mesh and the plastic edge of the Aokeo.

Best Value

If your buying decision is based on performance and price, then the Aokeo fabric mesh pop filter is the way to go. It is almost as good as the Gator Frameworks metal screen filter but comes in at about a third of the price.

Highly commended

The Sunmns Furry Windscreen Wind Cover, at the time of writing, is the same price as the Aokeo fabric pop filter and is almost as good at eliminating pops. Furthermore, it scores well under my other criteria and you can use the Sunmns windscreen as a dead cat on digital recorders like the Zoom H4n.

Real-world takeaway

All my test recordings were conducted with me at 6-inches from the Blue Yeti. However, when I increased that distance to 10-12 inches, even the poorest-performing pop filter/windscreen from my tests did a decent job. So, if you will be speaking at normal voice levels, and don’t need to be close, even the Mudder foam windscreen should keep your pops under control.

Pop Filter Reviews

Before I get into the reviews, I want to mention something, so I don’t have to repeat it in each of the following reviews.

These pop filters fall in one of two camps, they either fit directly onto the Blue Yeti (the first three windscreens below) or they have a gooseneck (the last three below) that is screwed onto a stand. My experience was that the gooseneck types were much easier to use with a mic stand or boom arm but were not as good when connected to the Blue Yeti’s desktop stand. In fact, each time I attached a gooseneck pop filter to the desktop stand, the black-painted surface of the stand was damaged.

Admittedly the paint chips were small, but I like to keep my gear looking as pristine as possible. I found it easier to get a separate desktop stand (a circular metal base and short vertical column) and attach the gooseneck to that. Having said that, I would recommend mounting most microphones, including the Yeti, on a mic stand or boom arm.

Mudder Blue Yeti Foam Cover Windscreen

Pop reduction rating 4.0
Overall rating 7.0

Blue-Yeti-with-Mudder-foam-windscreen

The Mudder is a simple foam windscreen, like the ones you frequently see reporters using on TV. It is black and made from high-density foam, i.e., it has a high pores per inch (PPI) count.

The windscreen is specifically designed for use with the Blue Yeti and Yeti Pro. It slips snuggly over the Yeti’s metal grille and will stay in place even if you invert the microphone.

The foam cover reaches below the bottom of the Yeti’s grille, ensuring there are no gaps for stray wind to get into the mic. I measured the foam windscreen to be about 75mm tall and 90mm wide, with the foam being 13mm thick.

In my opinion, the main purpose of most cheap foam windshields, like this one, is to protect the microphone from saliva, dust, and light plosives. That idea was upheld by my test results, with the Mudder foam windscreen being the least effective at stopping pops.

However, if you are not going to be close to the Blue Yeti, or if you can soften your plosives, the Mudder foam windscreen may work for you. Even if I am using another pop filter I keep a foam windscreen on my Blue Yeti, mainly for dust protection and hygiene purposes. Because the Mudder is cheap, I wouldn’t be without it, even though I use another pop filter to do the heavy lifting when it comes to eliminating pops.

Since this foam windscreen covers the entire microphone grille, it is suitable for any of the four polar patterns available on the Yeti. 

Moukey metal panel microphone pop filter

Pop reduction rating 5.6

Overall rating 6.8

Blue-Yeti-with-Moukey-pop

This pop filter is compatible with most condenser microphones, including the Blue Yeti, Yeti Pro and Yeti X, however, it is not suitable for Blue Yeti Nano.

It comes with two plastic mounting rings with non-slip rubber pads. These can accommodate microphones with diameters of 49-54mm or 66-60mm. For the Yeti, you use the larger ring.

The mounting ring clamps onto the Yeti’s body between the logo plate and the grille. Ensure the mounting bracket for the pop filter points upwards and is on the same side as the Yeti’s Blue logo.

There are two securing bolts, one to fasten the mounting ring on the microphone and one to attach the pop filter panel to the mounting ring. The bolt at the rear of the ring is immediately above the Yeti’s gain knob, which makes gain adjustment fiddly.

There are two rubber pads on the inner side of the mounting ring which help to make the mounting ring non-slip. The mounting ring is plastic but is probably durable enough if you intend to permanently leave it on your microphone. Rather than pulling the ring open to slip it around the Yeti’s body, I recommend opening the ring slightly larger than the diameter of the Yeti, then slipping it down from the top of the microphone. The pop filter then screws onto the mounting ring in front of the Blue Yeti’s grille.

If you are like me, you’ll probably drop the knurled screw nut before getting everything fixed up. Even so, installation only took a minute or so.

The pop filter has three layers. The outer one is a perforated metal panel with 16 rows of 1/8-inch circular holes, then there’s a middle fine metal mesh layer, and finally, a thin high-density foam layer.

The inner side of the pop filter sits about 5/8 inch (16mm) from the mic’s grille, which I would consider a little close. However, if you are 8 or 10 inches away, it works satisfactorily. For extra pop protection, you can fit a foam windscreen (like the Mudder windscreen) over the Yeti’s grille.

Since this pop filter only covers half of the microphone grille, it is best suited for the Yeti’s cardioid polar pattern.

Sunmns Furry Windscreen Wind Cover

Pop reduction rating 9.4

Overall rating 8.7

Blue-Yeti-with-Sunmns-Furry-windscreen

This is a furry wind muff with an elasticated neck that stays securely in place, even when inverted. It’s basically a furry wind muffler, with larger versions called dead cats, and normally used on shotgun microphones.

The elasticated banding on the open end is about half an inch wide and keeps the fur material flat against the Blue Yeti’s body. If you use a couple of fingers on both hands to keep the wind muff open, it then easily slips onto the microphone.

More expensive furry wind muffs usually have an outer fur layer and an inner foam layer. In contrast, the Sunmns fury windscreen only has the synthetic fur layer. Even so, it does a good job of stopping those plosives from being picked up by the Blue Yeti. It scored well in my tests, with a pop reduction rating of 9.4 and an overall rating of 8.7.

This windscreen is compatible with the Yeti, Yeti X, and probably a few other microphones and digital recorders, like the Zoom H4n.

Since this furry windscreen covers the entire microphone grille, it is suitable for any of the four polar patterns available on the Yeti.

Aokeo circular dual fabric layer mesh pop screen

Pop reduction rating 9.8

Overall rating 7.9

Blue-Yeti-with-Aokeo-fabric-mesh-pop-filter

The basic design of this pop filter has been around for many years, and that’s because it has been proven to be effective, reliable, and inexpensive. It is a circular band, usually plastic, with nylon fabric stretched across it. The idea is that the fabric allows the sound through but diffuses the fast-moving air from the plosives in your speech. Some designs have a single layer of fabric, while other manufacturers include two layers of fabric. However, the trick is to have an air gap between the two layers the air gap lets the diffused air spread before the second layer of fabric provides further diffusion. This is exactly the arrangement Aokeo adopted on their version of the design.

The circular head is about 5¾ inches across and is attached to a 15-inch long gooseneck that clamps onto the Yeti’s desktop stand or a boom arm. The gooseneck is flexible but stiff enough to stay in place. The weight of the pop filter does not cause any sagging once the pop filter is positioned in front of the microphone.

Although this pop filter is a proven design it does have one drawback. Because it is nearly 6-inch in diameter and has a thick edge ring it can obscure your view. This is awkward if you’re reading from a script, but with appropriate mic placement, this is not an insurmountable problem.

When it comes to stopping those pops, the Aokeo fabric mesh pop filter does a good job and was the runner-up in my tests judged purely on its pop-stopping ability.  It got a pop reduction rating of 9.8, but because it blocks the view forward the overall rating was 7.9.

Since this pop filter covers one side of the microphone grille, it is best suited for the Yeti’s cardioid polar pattern.

Aokeo metal mesh windscreen

Pop reduction rating 9.3

Overall rating 8.2

Blue-Yeti-with-Aokeo-metal-screen-pop-filter

The pop filter is a single layer of thin metal with a regular array of circular holes. My best attempt at measuring indicated the holes to be 0.75mm in diameter with a pitch of 1.25mm. The metal grille is mounted in a curved rectangular frame 110mm (4.3-inches) by 140mm (5.5-inches), which is attached to a 16-inch gooseneck that clamps onto the Yeti’s desktop stand or a boom arm. The gooseneck is flexible but stiff enough to stay in place. The weight of the pop filter does not cause any sagging once the pop filter is positioned in front of the microphone.

Because the pop filter is only 4.3-inches wide and the holes are sufficiently large to see through, it doesn’t completely obscure the view of a script (although the solid edge gets in the way a little). Its attractive appearance looks good whether you are recording a voiceover in a booth or a YouTube video.

It has a sturdy appearance and is easy to set up. In my test, it scored 9.3 for pop reduction and got an overall rating of 8.2.

Since this pop filter covers one side of the microphone grille, it is best suited for the Yeti’s cardioid polar pattern.

Gator Frameworks metal screen pop filter

Pop reduction rating 9.9

Overall rating 9.0

Blue-Yeti-with-Gator-Frameworks-metal-screen-pop-filter

On first inspection, this looks like a thin disc of metal that has been stamped with a diamond grille pattern. In fact, it is more sophisticated than that, which is reflected in the price. If you take a closer look at those holes, they are not a true diamond shape, the bottom has a curve and is angled. This shape causes the moving air to change direction and be deflected away from the microphone.

Where the other windscreens and pop filters work by diffusing the moving air, this design deflects the air so it cannot hit the mic’s diaphragm and cause a pop. Meanwhile, the sound wave passes through unaffected.

The metal screen has a minimalist design, with no outer ring. In fact, the ring isn’t necessary since the diamond grille pattering in the metal gives it sufficient rigidity. The screen attaches to a gooseneck that clamps onto the Yeti’s desktop stand or a microphone boom arm. The gooseneck is flexible but stiff enough to prevent any sagging.

Because the screen isn’t too wide, has many holes in it, and lacks an outer ring, this pop filter has the advantage of not obscuring your view if reading a script. Compare the test video of This pop filter with the Aokeo fabric mesh filter. In the Gator Frameworks video, you can clearly see my cheek through the metal screen, whereas the fabric mesh of the Aokeo obscures it.

My tests showed the Gator Frameworks metal screen pop filter to be the best performer in dealing with pops. It got a pop reduction rating of 9.9 and an overall rating of 9.0. It also looks professional and would not look out of place in a recording studio. If you are just concerned with performance, this is the pop filter to get.

The rim of the metal screen is exposed and where it has been cut across a hole the metal can catch on loose clothing etc. The sharp edges on the rim seem to have been blunted but take care not to scratch yourself or snag clothing.

An improvement over the other mics that use a gooseneck is that the Gator Frameworks p[op filter has a knurled metal fixing screw knob to secure the filter to a mic stand or the Blue Yeti’s desktop stand. The others have a plastic screw knob, which isn’t a surprise considering the difference in price.

Since this pop filter covers one side of the microphone grille, it is best suited for the Yeti’s cardioid polar pattern.

Summary

Any of these windscreens or pop filters will deal with pops if used in the right way and if you don’t over-emphasize your Ps and Bs. However, in the real world that isn’t always possible. Fortunately, even the most expensive pop filter in this test is likely to be affordable for most creators. My advice would be to buy the best you can afford, and if you are creating videos, consider how the pop filter looks.

Generally, I would recommend getting the Mudder Blue Yeti Foam Cover windscreen along with the pop filter of your choice. It will enhance the effect of the pop filter, but also protect the microphone from dust. Even when I am not using my Blue Yeti, I have the foam cover over the mic’s grille.

Tosh Lubek runs an audio and video production business in the UK and has been using the Canon EOS R since it was released in the Autumn of 2018 and the Canon EOS R6 in 2020. He has used both cameras to shoot TV commercials broadcast on Sky TV, promotional business videos, videos of events and functions, and YouTube creator content. He has also won several international awards for his advertising and promotional work. You can meet him by visiting his “video booth” at HashTag Business Events across the country.

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